Common Signs and Symptoms of Cancer in Men and Women

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Signs and Symptoms of Cancer

London: No matter your age or health, it’s good to know the possible signs of cancer. By themselves, they aren’t enough to diagnose the disease. But they can be clues for you and your doctor so that you can find and treat the problem as soon as possible. Treatment works best early on when a tumor is small and hasn’t spread.

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Today, people are living longer than ever after a cancer diagnosis due to improved cancer screenings. Routine screenings catch diseases earlier when they are more straightforward to treat. These symptoms don’t always mean cancer. Lots of common conditions can make you feel this way. It’s important to see your doctor so they can take a closer look at your health and take action.

Signs and Symptoms of Cancer

Prostate Cancer

What-is-Cancer

Early Signs and Symptoms of Cancer

Common signs and symptoms of cancer in both men and women include:

Pain:

Bone cancer often hurts from the beginning. Some brain tumors cause headaches that last for days and don’t get better with treatment. Pain can also be a late sign of cancer, so see a doctor if you don’t know why it’s happening or it doesn’t go away.

Weight loss without trying.

Almost half of the people who have cancer lose weight. It’s often one of the signs that they notice first. A loss of 10 pounds or more could be nothing to worry about. However, in rare cases, it may be the first sign of cancer.

Fatigue:

If you’re tired all the time and rest doesn’t help, tell your doctor. Leukemia often wears you out, or you could have blood loss from colon or stomach cancer. Cancer-related weight loss can leave you exhausted, too.
Fever. If it’s high or lasts more than 3 days, call your doctor. Some blood cancers, like lymphoma, cause a fever for days or even weeks.

Changes in your skin:

Have your doctor look at unusual or new moles, bumps, or marks on your body to be sure skin cancer isn’t lurking. Your skin can also provide clues to other kinds of cancers. If it’s darkened, looks yellow or red, itches, or sprouts more hair, or if you have an unexplained rash, it could be a sign of liver, ovarian, or kidney cancer, or lymphoma.

Sores that don’t heal:

Spots that bleed and won’t go away are also signs of skin cancer. Oral cancer can start as sores in your mouth. If you smoke, chew tobacco, or drink a lot of alcohol, you’re at higher risk.

Cough or hoarseness that doesn’t go away:

A cough is one sign of lung cancer, and hoarseness may mean cancer of your voice box (larynx) or thyroid gland.

Unusual bleeding:

Cancer can make blood show up where it shouldn’t be. Blood in your poop is a symptom of the colon or rectal cancer. And tumors along your urinary tract can cause blood in your urine.

Anemia:

This is when your body doesn’t have enough red blood cells, which are made in your bone marrow. Cancers like leukemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma can damage your marrow. Tumors that spread there from other places might crowd out regular red blood cells.

Today, people are living longer than ever after a cancer diagnosis due to improved cancer screenings. Routine screenings catch diseases earlier when they are more straightforward to treat.

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